Blog Archives

HELEN HANYU L

  Cloudy Days   I remember the clouds on that day being especially low in the sky. Pressing down, covering the little world I knew with an ashy gray. The trees rustling in the distance disrupted the silence fogging up the football field. The warm uncut grass itched my skin as we sat there with our Read more…

HELEN HANYU L

  The Boast by Rita Dove   At the dinner table, before the baked eggplant, you tell the story of your friend, Ira, how he kept a three-foot piranha in his basement.   “It was this long,” you say, extending your arms, “And it was striped, with silver scales and blue shadows.”   The man Read more…

HELEN (HANYU) L

  The Twenty-Six Miles’ March   Athenian hoplites, heavily armed foot soldiers of ancient Greece, marched with dignity and pride resting on their shoulders towards the battle that changed the ancient world – the Battle of Marathon. The opposing side, the Persians, also had all their honor and pride at stake. Both sides marched earnestly towards Read more…

HELEN (HANYU) L

A Wish’s Journey   It starts with a shiny penny plunging through the fountain. It continues with the quick flick of a fallen eyelash. Next it’s blown and travels the air from a dandelion, And it blossoms when met with a shooting star’s dashing flash.   It is dazzled when encountered by a simple wishbone. Read more…

HELEN (HANYU) L

The author is persuasive and clever. “I was confused, of course. I’d fallen in love not with this person, but with this place.” This reveals who she is and how she was in love with Vermont, rather than the person that brought her there. Also, “What’s so compelling to me about the mountains? Is it that there’s always somewhere to go? Is it the supramundane perspective afforded by a summit? Is it genetics?” The repeated “Is it …” provokes us to learn all the reasons why Bechdel would stay in Vermont. “I always feel a little out of place, but it’s place, of course, that binds me to these people.” This reveals that the reason she remained is that she truly adores the state, viewing it as more than the people there. Through this, the reader can feel as if Vermont is Bechdel and Bechdel is Vermont, since the place is what keeps her lingering: “…our microclimate, our brief spring-times, the particular contours and declivities of our rural, plural habitat.” The readers feel an invisible bonding among the citizens of Vermont, their unique love for their state, and their independence.