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SOPHIA S

Claude McKay wrote poetry, articles, and novels to depict the unfair life of a Negro in America. How did he discriminate in choosing friends? In one of his autobiographies, A Long Way from Home, McKay documented his emotions, personality, and experiences as he traveled from Harlem to London to Russia to France to Africa and back to America. Along the way, he met many influential people and made many dear friends. Some of these friends were revolutionists, most involved in advancing Communism. McKay fought the war against discrimination with these people and others. Figues such as James Weldon Johnson, Walter White, other leaders of the National Association of the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), black radicals of Harlem, and the Japanese Communist Sen Katayama. He was not racist when making friends, and he was aware that there were plenty of whites who supported his cause. Some white associates of McKay, such as Frank Harris and Max Eastman, were major figures of the time, but McKay also had personal companions. A prime example is Michael, McKay’s white friend who was also a thief and a gangster.

SOPHIA S

Mileena Nguyen’s Three Simple Words is narrated by Evangeline Garnier, a girl who seems to possess a mysterious power to feel the pain of others. The story begins with a quote from Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s Evangeline, which happens to have the same name as the protagonist. This is probably not a coincidence, as the prologue Read more…

SOPHIA S

  Sophia’s commentary on “Morality and Perspective in Eudora Welty’s Flowers for Marjorie and A Memory”, by Robert Cheng The essay begins with the author quoting the great thinker Socrates and telling the reader of Socrates’ objections to the Athenians’ direct democracy. He then relates this to the central idea of his essay, which discusses Read more…